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Can You Safely Mix Xanax and Cocaine?

You cannot safely mix Xanax and cocaine. Combining the two is likely to lead to overdose.

Xanax Use

Xanax is a prescription anti-anxiety medication that belongs to the benzodiazepine class of drugs. It is the most prescribed psychiatric medication in the United States because it is so effective at quickly producing a sense of calm in people struggling with anxiety.

This quick and effective fix, however, is what leads many people to become dependent on Xanax and misuse it.
In addition to using Xanax to manage anxiety and panic disorders, it is also a popular recreational drug. People abuse Xanax that they obtain through legal prescriptions and illicit Xanax that is bought off the streets. Along with creating a pleasant sense of calm, even in people who don’t struggle with anxiety, Xanax can have euphoric effects when high enough doses are consumed.

Xanax Abuse

People with a history of substance use disorders or who are likely to misuse the medication are advised to use Xanax with caution, as it is habit-forming.

Between 1998 and 2008, the number of people who received treatment for a benzodiazepine use disorder increased threefold. People who abuse Xanax long term are likely to develop an addiction to it that may be accompanied by depression, episodes of psychosis, and aggressive or impulsive behavior.
In 2011, over 1.2 million people went to the emergency room for prescription drug misuse. Ten percent of these incidents involved Xanax.

drug addiction

Cocaine Abuse

Cocaine is a stimulant drug most commonly used for recreational reasons. It is produced from leaves of the coca plant that primarily grows in South America.

Cocaine in the U.S. is typically sold as a fine white powder on the streets. This is a dangerous way to purchase cocaine, however, as it is often cut with other more potent substances in an attempt for illicit drug manufacturers to stretch their product and make a greater profit.
In recent years, there has been an increasing number of cocaine-related fatal overdoses. These deaths are likely due to people unknowingly consuming a tampered product.

Additional stimulants such as amphetamine, or synthetic opioids like fentanyl, are frequently cut into cocaine. This is particularly dangerous because an opioid as strong as fentanyl can cause a fatal overdose at very low doses. People who think they are only using pure cocaine don’t adjust their use habits to the potent and dangerous drugs that have been mixed in.

Escalating Cocaine Use

People enjoy using cocaine because of the energetic and intense high it produces. Because of how intense the high is, however, it is also highly addictive. Cocaine causes dopamine to build up in the brain, which floods the brain’s reward system with pleasurable feelings.

Over time, this makes people less sensitive to the effects of cocaine. People typically solve their sensitivity to cocaine by taking more of it, which only exposes them to increased risks of addiction and overdose.

Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Xanax

drowsy woman

Whether you take Xanax for medical or recreational reasons, you can expect to experience some short-term and long-term side effects.

When used properly, your risk of long-term effects should be minimal, as it is only meant to be used for the short-term management of symptoms related to anxiety. Nonetheless, many people end up taking Xanax for longer than they intended, or they misuse it recreationally, which can lead to an addiction.
Short-term and long-term effects of Xanax include the following:
• Drowsiness and tiredness
• Dizziness
• Insomnia
• Memory problems
• Impaired balance and coordination
• Slurred speech
• Trouble concentrating
• Irritability
• Diarrhea and/or constipation
• Increased sweating
• Headache
• Nausea and vomiting
• Upset stomach
• Changes in appetite and weight
• Swelling in the hands and feet
• Muscle weakness
• Dry mouth
• Stuffy nose
• Decreased libido
• Tolerance
• Dependence
• Addiction
Although most of the above side effects are expected to clear up on their own as your body gets used to processing Xanax, if they persist or worsen, you should speak with your doctor right away.

Long-term use of Xanax increases your risk of developing physical and psychological dependence on the drug, which is often followed by addiction. Keeping a close watch on possible side effects of Xanax will help you reduce your risk of long-term complications.

woman suffering from anxiety

Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Cocaine

People enjoy using cocaine for the quick and intense high or rush it produces. It is a potent stimulant that is immediately energizing, but it also comes with a set of less pleasant and much more dangerous side effects.
Short-term and long-term effects of cocaine include the following:
• Increased heart rate
• Increased blood pressure
• Increased body temperature
• Loss of appetite
• Dilated pupils
• Disrupted sleep
• Nausea
• Intense euphoria
• Hyperstimulation
• Bizarre and erratic behavior
• Anxiety and paranoia
• Panic
• Psychosis
• Intense drug cravings
• Tolerance
• Seizure
• Sudden death
• Permanent damage to blood vessels leading to the brain and heart
• Heart attack
• Stroke
• Liver and kidney damage
• Infectious diseases
• Weight loss
• Tooth decay
• Hallucinations
• Disorientation
• Mood disturbances
• Addiction
Some of the more serious side effects of cocaine use, such as addiction and sudden death, can happen with just one use of the drug. Heart attack, stroke, and respiratory failure can happen at any time when using cocaine.

Long-term use of the drug is likely to lead to addiction because it changes the way your brain processes chemicals..

Is There a Safe Amount of Cocaine and Xanax That Can Be Mixed?

Cocaine and Xanax are potent drugs that should never be mixed.

As a stimulant, cocaine works to activate systems throughout your body, while Xanax works hard to calm them down.

Dumping substances into your body that send mixed signals like this can be very difficult for your system to handle. As a result, you run the risk of drugs building up in your system because your body is not able to process either one effectively.
As drugs build up in your body, your risk of overdose increases. You may not realize how much of each drug is still in your system. As you take more of each drug, it becomes too much for your body to handle. Mixing drugs, such as Xanax and cocaine, can lead to overdose.
The following are signs of a drug overdose:
• Nausea and vomiting
• Impaired cognition
• Reduced coordination
• Cool or clammy skin
• Loss of consciousness
• Extremely low breathing rate
• Low blood pressure
In addition to the above symptoms, if you or someone you’re with is displaying any concerning symptoms, don’t hesitate to seek medical care. Most overdoses can be treated before they become fatal, so it is important to get help as soon as you can.

rocks balancing

Potential Dangers of Mixing Xanax and Cocaine

The greatest dangers associated with mixing Xanax and cocaine are that you cannot accurately predict how your body will respond to the combination of the two drugs, and you are putting yourself at a significantly increased risk of overdose.

Since Xanax and cocaine produce opposite effects, you may be inclined to consume more of either drug in an attempt to achieve the high you are looking for. Increasing doses of drugs, especially when mixed with other substances, can quickly lead to an overdose.
If you have already mixed Xanax and cocaine, it is important to monitor the side effects you experience very closely. Don’t consume any more of either drug and seek medical help if you begin to exhibit any concerning symptoms.

Xanax and cocaine is not a safe combination.

SOURCES

Drug Overdose Signs and Treatment. (September 2018). Verywell Mind.
The Truth About Cocaine. Foundation for a Drug-Free World International.
What is Cocaine? (July 2018). National Institute on Drug Abuse.
What You Need to Know About Xanax. (December 2017). Medical News Today.
Xanax. (March 2017). RxList.