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Our Approach

Our program provides many options for optimal success.

12 Step vs SMART Recovery

WE KNOW THAT A SOLID AFTERCARE PLAN, WHICH INCLUDES A SUPPORT GROUP THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU, IS CRITICAL FOR LONG-TERM ABSTINENCE.

From day one, we approach aftercare and support groups as an extremely important part of your treatment. Everyone on your treatment team will become involved in this aspect of your treatment.

OUR APPROACH IS INTEGRATED, WHICH MEANS WE OFFER BOTH FAITH-BASED (12 STEPS) OR EVIDENCE BASED (SMART RECOVERY) SUPPORT GROUPS IN-HOUSE AND IN THE COMMUNITY. WE OFFER THESE TO YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS, TOO.

We’ll expose you to both approaches while you are in treatment. You decide what’s right for you once you leave.

EVERY MEMBER OF OUR STAFF IS TRAINED IN, AND SUPPORTIVE OF, ALL KINDS OF ADDICTION SUPPORT GROUPS.


THE 12 STEP PROGRAM

We believe that a person’s choice of which community support meetings they attend should be an informed one.  That is why we explain recovery concepts from an integrated perspective, discussing Resurgence’s approach to addiction treatment and the 12 Step philosophy.

12 Step meetings are offered and encouraged. We will immense you in to the 12 Step Program while you are in treatment at Resurgence, along with exposure to other addiction support group options.  You may choose to “work the steps” with a sponsor or during your individual sessions with experienced counselors.

The term “12 Step” is used to refer to a number of programs that are substance specific, such as Narcotics Anonymous, Marijuana Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous etc., and are based on the 12 Step principles of Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.).  Alcoholics Anonymous, in the U.S. and Canada alone, consists of millions of members that make up a support network known as “The Fellowship”.

 

History:

A.A. was started in 1935 in Akron, Ohio, after a meeting between Bill W., a New York stockbroker, and Dr. Bob S., an Akron surgeon. Both had been alcoholics and were dissatisfied with the current approaches to recovery.  Bill was successful in his personal recovery, but saw that many of his peers were unable to achieve abstinence.

Bill emphasized that alcoholism was a malady of mind, emotions and body.  He had learned this from Dr. William D. Silkworth of Towns Hospital in New York, where Bill had often been a patient. Though a physician, Dr. Bob had not believed alcoholism to be a disease. It was in response to Bill’s ideas that Bob gained sobriety, never to drink again, and A.A. was born.

Early in 1939, the Fellowship published its basic textbook, Alcoholics Anonymous. The text, written by Bill, explained A.A.’s philosophy and methods, the core of which was the now well-known 12 Steps of recovery. The book was also reinforced by case histories of some thirty recovered members. From this point forward, A.A.’s growth was rapid.

 

Theory:

A.A. believes that recovery is found through study and “service”, or mentorship and companionship of others seeking sobriety.  Meetings are free and anonymous, and held throughout the world.

There are two main texts that contain the 12 Step philosophy. The first is Alcoholics Anonymous (576 pages), AKA “The Big Book.” Originally published in 1939, this is the “book of experience” from which the Fellowship derived its name. It contains an analysis of the principles that led to the sobriety of the earliest members and was intended to represent a cross section of members’ personal stories.

The later editions added new personal experiences.  It is asserted that through study and the telling of the journeys of others in recovery, one can gain the personal insights necessary to follow in the paths of those before them and find wellness.

12 Steps and 12 Traditions (192 pages), AKA “The 12 and 12,” was published in 1953, and contains a detailed description of both the 12 Steps themselves, and the 12 Traditions which are the belief tenets of the organization.

Our 12 Step rehab program at Resurgence does not require newcomers to accept in totality the 12 Steps as written, rather encourages exploration and interpretation of the concepts contained within.  The use of the term “God” and “Higher Power” is particularly open for discussion, and substituted terms and concepts are encouraged for contemplation.

A.A. philosophy does hold that alcoholism is a progressive illness, and cannot be cured, but can be suppressed, and total abstinence from alcohol is the only way to stop the progression.

 

The 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous:

We admitted we were powerless over alcohol — that our lives had become unmanageable.

Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

Continued to take personal inventory and promptly admitted when we were wrong.

Sought, through prayer and meditation, to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Resource Links:

  • AA General Information
  • eBook Access
  • Narcotics Anonymous
  • Codependents Anonymous
  • Pill Addicts Anonymous
  • Marijuana Anonymous

 

SMART RECOVERY

At Resurgence, we believe that a person’s choice of which type of community support meetings they attend should be an informed one.  That is why we explain recovery concepts from an integrated perspective, discussing Resurgence’s approach to addiction treatment and the SMART Recovery philosophy.

SMART stands for Self-Management and Recovery Training. It’s an alternative to 12 Step support groups that are based on the latest research and scientific advances in addiction. SMART groups approach addiction as an undesirable behavior, rather than as a character defect or a disease.  SMART’s official approach on addiction as a disease,  “If it’s a disease, don’t use. If it’s not a disease, don’t use.”  SMART Recovery works whether you believe addiction is a disease or not.

SMART meetings are offered and encouraged at Resurgence. We will expose you thoroughly to SMART Recovery while you are in treatment at Resurgence, along with exposure to other addiction support group options.  You may even choose to be trained as a SMART Recovery Group Facilitator while you are in treatment!

Without a doubt, Resurgence is a leader in providing SMART Recovery resources and education to our clients. Many clients choose to come to us for this very reason.

SMART Recovery is a non-profit organization and is the 2nd largest addiction support group in the world, after 12 Step Groups. SMART Recovery has 2500 face-to-face meetings currently operating around the globe. They also have an extremely active online community, which can be accessed at www.smartrecovery.org.

SMART Recovery is abstinence based, focused on stopping and staying free from all addictive behaviors and substances.

There are four points to the SMART Recovery program:

  1. Staying Motivated
  2. Coping with Urges
  3. Managing Thoughts, Feelings and Behaviors, and
  4. Lifestyle Balance

SMART is based on four well known behavioral theories of psychology:

  1. Stages of Change
  2. Motivational Interviewing
  3. Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), and
  4. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy

SMART meetings are led by trained facilitators and usually last 90 minutes. At a SMART meeting, cross-talk (comments and suggestions between meeting participants) is encouraged.

Only people who have been trained to lead SMART meetings are allowed do so. There are two ways to become a trained SMART facilitator:

  1. You must sign up on the website, smartrecovery.org. There is a small fee for the course, which takes approximately 30 hours and is completed in approximately 30 days, or
  2. Attend a face-to-face training, such as ones offered at Resurgence. Our clients may be offered the chance to attend SMART Facilitator Training while they are in treatment. This training takes two days and allows our clients to leave treatment with the ability to set up their own SMART group once they discharge from our program. The SMART Recovery face-to-face facilitator training is one of the most popular offerings at Resurgence!

We offer regular SMART meetings for our clients and the public, led by trained SMART Recovery facilitators.

 

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